Self-taught software, data, and cloud engineer who continuously improves his skills through blogs, videos, and online tutorials.
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The script! (if you’re just here for this)

This article provides you with an easy script to create GitHub Gists from your repositories.

Adding code in Medium articles can be done in one of three ways. In line code , in a code block

like this.
Such a block is more useful
when
you
need
to
present
multiple
lines
of
code

or with a GitHub gist

Example of a GitHub Gist

Let us focus on those gists. When I wanted to add them into my Medium articles, I knew they were hosted on GitHub. So naturally, the first thing I did was create a GitHub repository for my Medium articles and start adding snippet files. Each file was going to be a single gists. When I was done creating ten-ish files, I though to myself “Okay, now how do I turn theses into gists?”. Aaaaaand that’s when I went “Urgh… 😑”. It turns out that GitHub Gists is something different to GitHub Repositories. In order to create gists, I had to manually create each gists in the browser. But I already spent all that time creating and maintaining them as files in my repository. Moreover, Gists does not provide any structure to sets of gists related to separated projects. They’re all just thrown on the same heap of gists. There had to be a better option. …


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Photo by Florian Wächter on Unsplash

In this article I’ll share with you some useful tips and tricks when using AWS CDK Pipelines that go beyond the simple demos and which can be implemented in your real-world applications.

The AWS Cloud Development Kit (AWS CDK) is an open source software development framework to define your cloud application resources using familiar programming languages. This latter is the biggest difference from other infrastructure-as-code tools, which use configuration files and special-purpose languages. AWS CDK is a framework which, under the hood, creates AWS CloudFormation templates to deploy AWS resources. The power of AWS CDK is that it allows you to construct an AWS CloudFormation template of more than 500 lines that deploys 50 AWS resources with a mere 20 lines of code! In addition to the high level of abstraction and default configuration, you can include programmatic logic when defining your infrastructure, use object-oriented techniques, and create and share libraries. …


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Photo by Birmingham Museums Trust on Unsplash

This article is part of a series How to Organically Grow your Python Project in which I cover the different steps you will go through when starting a new Python hobby project. The focus of this series lies on not knowing in advance what you want to make and thus not planning the whole project from the start.

In this article I’ll talk about how you can automate running the tests of your Python hobby project. Automated testing can be achieved in several ways but I will limit this article to explicitly showing one and conceptually talk about the others. The one I will focus on is the easiest to implement. As with the other articles in this series, I will elaborate on the steps I have chronologically taken to achieve this for my own hobby project. This should convince you that developing an arbitrary complex application can, and should, be done incrementally. …


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Photo by Kin Li on Unsplash

This article is part of a series How to Organically Grow your Python Project in which I cover the different steps you will go through when starting a new Python hobby project. The focus of this series lies on not knowing in advance what you want to make and thus not planning the whole project from the start.

In this article I’ll talk about how I started writing the first tests of my Python hobby project. This is a story from my point of view and does not serve as the only approach. It merely shows a path you can take to implement tests and make your application more robust. This article is also no exhaustive list of different types of tests. …


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Photo by Lucie Capkova on Unsplash

This article is part of a series How to Organically Grow your Python Project in which I cover the different steps you will go through when starting a new Python hobby project. The focus of this series lies on not knowing in advance what you want to make and thus not planning the whole project from the start.

In this article I’ll talk about the first steps that I took when starting my Python hobby project. This is a story from my point of view and does not serve as the ground truth. It merely shows that I find it normal that developing anything is a continuous process of refactoring. Write some code, make it work, and improve this later. Nothing will ever be perfect, even less so from the very beginning. …


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Photo by Miti on Unsplash

In this series, I cover different stages of the natural growth process of a hobby Python project. I write this series because there are a lot of articles out there on how to develop and structure a Python project yet they frequently start from a prior knowledge on what the project should be. What the end goal will be. But maybe you don’t have this luxury… In this series, I start from the principle that you, the developer, have no idea yet where you want to go with your project, a scenario that often occurs with hobby projects. This means that you don’t have to worry about a ton of practicalities before you can even write some code, hereby lowering the threshold to actually start with your project. Because how often have you thought “I’m gonna start with a fun hobby project!”? …

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